Indonesia relationship focused countries

Indonesia - Wikipedia

indonesia relationship focused countries

Since a long time, people and populations living in the Indonesian archipelago, have been in contact with foreign cultures and populations. Some of them settled . Indonesia is now one of Asia Pacific's most vibrant democracies that has maintained political stability and emerged as a confident middle-income country. And despite Jokowi's stated focus on piracy and other illegal maritime activities, Indonesia and other Southeast Asian nations still struggle.

In Individualist societies the focus is on the nuclear family only.

Foreign relations of Indonesia - Wikipedia

A low score Feminine on the dimension means that the dominant values in society are caring for others and quality of life. A Feminine society is one where quality of life is the sign of success and standing out from the crowd is not admirable. The fundamental issue here is what motivates people, wanting to be the best Masculine or liking what you do Feminine.

indonesia relationship focused countries

Indonesia scores 46 on this dimension and is thus considered low Masculine. While not entirely like most North European countries who are very low in Masculinity and thus considered Feminine, Indonesia is less Masculine than some other Asian countries like Japan, China and India. In Indonesia status and visible symbols of success are important but it is not always material gain that brings motivation. Conflicts are resolved by compromise and negotiation.

Incentives such as free time and flexibility are favoured. Focus is on well-being, status is not shown. An effective manager is a supportive one, and decision making is achieved through involvement. In contrast, Masculine countries and to an extent lower Masculine countries that do not score too low on the scale to be called Feminine countries, display the traits of the Masculine societies but in a lesser degree.

indonesia relationship focused countries

Uncertainty Avoidance The dimension Uncertainty Avoidance has to do with the way that a society deals with the fact that the future can never be known: This ambiguity brings with it anxiety and different cultures have learnt to deal with this anxiety in different ways. The extent to which the members of a culture feel threatened by ambiguous or unknown situations and have created beliefs and institutions that try to avoid these is reflected in the score on Uncertainty Avoidance.

Indonesia scores 48 on this dimension and thus has a low preference for avoiding uncertainty. This means that there is a strong preference in Indonesia toward the Javanese culture of separation of internal self from external self. When a person is upset, it is habitual for the Indonesian not to show negative emotion or anger externally.

They will keep smiling and be polite, no matter how angry they are inside. This also means that maintaining work place and relationship harmony is very important in Indonesia, and no one wishes to be the transmitter of bad or negative news or feedback.

Another aspect of this dimension can be seen in Conflict resolution.

indonesia relationship focused countries

Direct Communication as a method of conflict resolution is often seen to be a threatening situation and one that the Indonesian is uncomfortable in. A tried and tested, successful method of conflict diffusion or resolution is to take the more familiar route of using a third party intermediary, which has many benefits.

The reason is multifold; but if you extrapolate to UAI dimension you can see that keeping the boss happy means you will be rewarded and if you are rewarded you have no economic or status uncertainty as you will keep being a valuable member of the company. Long Term Orientation This dimension describes how every society has to maintain some links with its own past while dealing with the challenges of the present and future, and societies prioritise these two existential goals differently.

Those with a culture which scores high, on the other hand, take a more pragmatic approach: In societies with a pragmatic orientation, people believe that truth depends very much on situation, context and time. Read the Joint Statement.

indonesia relationship focused countries

This represents the next step in boosting Australia-Indonesia maritime cooperation following the signing of the Joint Declaration in February Recent bilateral visits include: Both countries reaffirmed their commitment to strengthening bilateral relations in August by signing a Joint Understanding on the implementation of the Lombok Treaty, which provides an agreed approach to enhancing intelligence cooperation. Australia and Indonesia also work closely on a range of common strategic interests in regional and global fora.

indonesia relationship focused countries

Cooperation on counter-terrorism Australian and Indonesian authorities have cooperated closely to detect and deter terrorist attacks in Indonesia since the Bali bombings. Our counter-terrorism cooperation now involves a wide range of partnerships in law enforcement, legal framework development, criminal justice, counter-terrorism financing, countering violent extremism, defence, transport and border security, intelligence, and the security of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive CBRNE materials.

More than 15, officials from 70 countries have completed over training courses at JCLEC on addressing transnational crimes — such as people smuggling and money laundering — as well as terrorism.

Cooperation on combatting people smuggling Australia and Indonesia work closely together to combat people smuggling and human trafficking, including by co-chairing the Bali Process on People Smuggling, Trafficking in Persons and Related Transnational Crime.

We strongly support cooperative measures with Indonesia to improve border integrity and enforcement. We also continue to work with our regional partners to combat people smuggling and human trafficking, by strengthening legal frameworks and boosting the capabilities of criminal justice agencies and civil society organisations.

Trade and investment There is considerable opportunity for Australia to expand its trade, investment and economic cooperation relationship with Indonesia, which is the largest economy in South-east Asia and 16th largest economy in the world.

Country Comparison - Hofstede Insights

Demand in Indonesia for consumer goods and services — particularly for premium food and beverages, education and healthcare, financial and ICT services and tourism — and its ambitious infrastructure investment agenda aligns well with Australian industry capabilities.

Agricultural products are among Australia's key merchandise exports to Indonesia, while crude petroleum and manufactured goods are key imports. IA-CEPA will create the framework for a new era of closer economic engagement between Australia and Indonesia and open new markets and opportunities for businesses, primary producers, service providers and investors. Australia also works closely with Indonesia in in multilateral, global and regional fora, including the World Trade Organization WTOAPEC and the G20to support global and regional trade liberalisation and economic growth.

Development cooperation Australia works in an economic partnership with Indonesia, supporting its efforts to leverage its own resources to generate growth and distribute those benefits to a larger number of its people. Australia provides policy and technical advice that will improve the quality of Indonesia's investments in infrastructure, economic governance, human development and social policy.

Foreign relations of Indonesia

Priority areas include good governance, improved productivity and competitiveness, and human resource quality. It has a focus on eastern Indonesia to help address regional disparities in development, whilst maintaining growth momentum in other parts of the country. As outlined in our AIP, our development cooperation program in Indonesia is structured around three objectives, and a focus on women and girls is a cross-cutting theme of all of our programs.

Australia is supporting Indonesia to boost inclusive growth and productive jobs through its public policy and regulatory settings. We are also working to increase access to agricultural markets for poor farmers in Eastern Indonesia, driving economic growth and improving food security in the region. Human development for a productive society Indonesia needs to drive the development of human capital to create the conditions for higher growth.

Our innovative education program works with schools to identify local challenges and opportunities to develop new approaches to tackle problems. We are also working with Indonesia to prevent, detect and control emerging infectious diseases, a threat to Indonesian and Australian security, and we continue to prepare for and provide support to Indonesia during times of humanitarian need.